The Power of Listening

by Kevin Rohm, Director of Sampling and Panel Services

During my “I know everything” teenage years, my mother would put me in place with her beloved quote “We have two ears and one mouth so that we can listen twice as much as we speak.”  While I am many years removed from my mother’s sage advice, I was recently reminded about the power of listening. 

We were struggling with a high number of partial completes on a study.  Our client and our team got together to figure out what was happening. It was painful on both ends – our client needed the study finished fast and wanted more survey invites sent out.  We knew the partial rate was way out of line but couldn’t figure out why.

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The Recruiting Lessons I Learned from Running

by Michael Georgianna, Account Director

Hitting the pavement the other day, it occurred to me that training for a race is a bit like Qual recruiting.  I can’t just get up on race day and start running; I have to train all year long. Qual recruiting is the same way.  Our recruiters just don’t call physicians randomly, and physicians don’t just up and participate in qualitative research. We maintain positive relationships with our healthcare professionals consistently day in and day out, so they respond to our calls. Our recruiters and project managers are like the lean, weathered runners I see on the annual Broad Street Run. With an average tenure of 15+ years, our team has honed their craft through thousands of recruits.

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4 Tips for Getting Sample for your DIY Survey

By Kevin Rohm, Director of Sampling and Panel Services

As a healthcare professional panel provider for 29 years, you could say we’ve seen it all!  So, it comes as no surprise that we have some strong opinions about what it takes to get the right sample for your DIY survey.  Here are our top 4 tips:

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Exclusion lists: what are they, why care?

by Nick Urda, Account Director

To most people, exclusion lists fall somewhere between the quantum void (aka, nothing) and the quark (aka, minutiae).  But – like physics – just because we don’t think deeply about them, doesn’t mean they aren’t important!

What & Why

An exclusion list is needed when multiple panel providers are brought in to support a study.  If a healthcare professional (HCP) receives a study invite through one panel provider and either terminates at some point or completes the study, then we do not want that respondent to be invited by another panel provider.  We add the respondent to the exclusion list and share the list with the other panel providers, so they do not send that same survey invitation to that same HCP.

Sidenote: Although Reckner typically completes 90% of studies with our own panel, when we do bring on a partner for our data collection, we provide an exclusion list.  And since we often serve as a partner for other provider’s studies, we also ask for exclusion lists, so that we can tailor the distribution of our invitations accordingly.

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Conducting Patient Chart Research with Healthcare Professionals

Patient chart research is challenging!  Healthcare professionals can be reluctant to participate.  Reminders are needed (repeatedly).  Physicians forget where they left off.

And yet, the demand for it is greater than ever.  Stop stressing.  We can help.

With nearly three decades conducting research with healthcare professionals, we know how to find the most engaged respondents and establish correct commitment expectations upfront.  And our veteran team of recruiters and project managers ensures your patient chart research runs smoothly from first recruit to final data. 

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Introducing Respondent First™

There’s been a lot of discussion about physician burnout. Simultaneously (and perhaps ironically), there is also the reality of increasing physician compensation (see the Medical Group Management Association’s annual compensation survey). Clearly, these trends are having an impact on physician market research participation.

Our analysis of physician market research participation shows that, while healthcare professionals do participate because of the opportunity to contribute to their profession and to gain insights into industry developments, honoraria still remains the number one reason for participation.

Going beyond appropriate honoraria, what can we offer which cuts through the demands of the profession and inspires participation of the most insightful and knowledgeable healthcare professionals?

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